Yule

Date: December 21

Other Names: Winter Solstice

Goddesses: Brigid, Isis, Demeter, Gaia, Diana

Gods: Apollo, Ra, Odin, Lugh, The Oak King, The Green Man

Colours: Red, White, Green

Foods: Lemons, Oranges, Nuts, Eggnog

Herbs: Bayberry, Blessed thistle, Laurel, Pine, Sage

Incense: Pine, Cedar, Bayberry, Cinnamon, Frankincense

Oil: Pine, Cedar, Bayberry, Cinnamon, Frankincense

Stones: Ruby, Bloodstone, Garnet, Emerald, Diamond

Animals: Stag, Robin

This is the shortest day of the year and is a time when early Pagans would have supplicated the forces of nature to bring back the sun. It is a cold and dismal time as the trees have shed their leaves and few plants are growing. Fires are lit to mark the return of the sun. The Goddess gives birth to the Sun God and the days begin to slowly lengthen and the nights recede as the sun returns. The balance of nature is shown as both God and Goddess are important in bringing us strength and warmth for our growing season.

The Goddess, after enduring a winter of labor is now resting after her delivery. From the death of the God in Samhain he is born again in Yule; a sign that from death comes rebirth and that death is not to be feared for it is part of a natural cycle. Popular foods at this time of year will represent and contain the Sun God’s energy. Mistletoe and Holly are used to represent to God and Goddess.

This entry was posted in Holidays and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply